Stress

Stress

Dealing with People Who Are Always Right

Dealing with People Who Are Always Right

Have you ever been in a conversation—fully aware that the person to whom you’re speaking—isn’t really listening? Typically, these poor listeners are narcissistic types who are not only poor listeners but are also in the same category as people who think they’re always right.

It makes sense. If I thought I was always right, I probably wouldn’t believe I had anything to learn. And, I’d probably feel compelled to share my wisdom with the world. This attitude, which is not only arrogant but dysfunctional as well, creates a negative reputation with others.

Ask yourself, how do you rate as a listener? It never hurts to give your perspective a check-up. Do you feel an urgency to prove yourself right more often than not? Or, do you have the need to monopolize conversations at the expense of others?

Dealing with the problem

In many cases, people who have a pathological need to be right at all times are insecure, and this character flaw is a symptom of it. Other times the person is simply egotistical and condescending. Either way, it’s best to accept that the person may never change and take note of some suggestions for dealing with these circumstances:

Ask questions. Since direct argumentation rarely works with these people, ask questions to learn what evidence supports the person’s posture on the subject. Find out why “the person is right.”
Stay levelheaded. Different dynamics dictate separate responses but, remember, there is little that warrants losing your composure. Don’t allow someone’s narcissistic ways to make you come unglued. Believe me, you’ll regret it.
Ignore it. I believe this is the wisest way to deal with people who are always right. The more time you spend with that person, the more time you waste on a problem that’s not really yours to solve.
Choose your battles. This option depends largely upon the relationship you have to the person who is always right. But, if it is your boss, you should choose your battles wisely. Why jeopardize your job security over a matter for which the outcome isn’t your responsibility?

Overcoming Stress

Overcoming Stress

Stress, according to the Oxford Dictionary, is “a state of mental or emotional tension resulting from adverse of very demanding circumstances.” Often stress results in a feeling of powerlessness or depression that can spiral out of control and leave people feeling stuck and immobilized to change their current situations. It can be expressed in terms of personal insecurities, guild, negative thoughts or general, non-specific worry. Regardless of the source, it is also one of the highest risk factors for cancer and a shortened life span.

Unfortunately, there is no “one size fits all” solution for managing stress. That said, here are some tips and suggestions you can use to reduce stress and heal your life:

Get healthy. Quit smoking. Reduce drinking. Avoid junk food.
Use music (singing, listening, playing) as therapy.
Walk and exercise more. Make it a daily habit.
Reach out to others. Talk to trusted colleagues, friends, family members or a professional counselor.
Do volunteer work.
Learn to say “no” to people and activities that are toxic for you.
Learn to adapt. Flexibility is key. Put things in perspective.
Make time for fun and relaxation. Laugh, engage, and live audaciously.