Authentic Conversations
of Guts, Grit, and Gusto
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Authentic Conversations

of Guts, Grit, and Gusto

Watch Intro Video
Watch Greeting

Inspirational SPEAKER & international best-selling author

Dr. Erica Miller

Dr. Erica Miller is a multi-faceted, dynamic speaker and author with a long history of “telling it like it is.” A Holocaust survivor, entrepreneur, world traveler and international best-selling author, she captivates audiences with her colorful stories, passion for life and undeniable spark. The outcome is a truly unforgettable encounter, full of life lessons, wisdom and empowering insights that give audiences of all ages a unique look at how to overcome life’s challenges with strength, courage and the spirit to make a difference.

Speaking Topics

The Audacity of Aging With Gusto!

Dr. Miller is a natural spokesperson for positivity, vitality and longevity. She offers practical advice for healthy living to age 123..

Guts, Grit, and Gusto

Dr. Miller believes throughout our lives we are on a journey of continuous evolvement. She inspires audiences with her belief about the importance of having a vision and turning that vision into reality.

Don’t Tell Me I Can’t Do It!

Dr. Erica Miller shares her unique philosophy that inspires people to abandon the limitations expressed by nay-sayers and proactively pursue the lives they desire.

Living Fearlessly: A Holocaust Survivor’s Story

Dr. Miller provides a bold and gripping account of her four years in a Nazi holding camp. Through her no-holds-barred story of bravery and survival, audiences learn how to develop survival strategies and live life fearlessly.

Be Captivated…

In front of an audience, Dr. Miller shines because she speaks her mind. She connects with audiences of all types and ages as she delivers meaningful and relevant information with an irreverent, whimsical, and spontaneous style. ‘Little and mighty’ as her license plate reads, her dynamic approach and matchless optimism energize the entire room.

Speaking Topics

Living Fearlessly: A Holocaust Survivor’s Story

Dr. Miller provides a bold and gripping account of her four years in a Nazi holding camp. Through her no-holds-barred story of bravery and survival, audiences learn how to develop survival strategies and live life fearlessly.

Guts, Grit, and Gusto: Finding Your Strength

Dr. Miller believes throughout our lives we are on a journey of continuous evolvement. She inspires audiences with her belief about the importance of having a vision and turning that vision into reality.

The Audacity of Aging With Gusto!

Dr. Miller is a natural spokesperson for positivity, vitality and longevity. She offers practical advice for healthy living to age 123..

Don’t Tell Me I Can’t Do It!

Dr. Erica Miller shares her unique philosophy that inspires people to abandon the limitations expressed by nay-sayers and proactively pursue the lives they desire.

Be Captivated…

In front of an audience, Dr. Miller shines because she speaks her mind. She connects with audiences of all types and ages as she delivers meaningful and relevant information with an irreverent, whimsical, and spontaneous style. ‘Little and mighty’ as her license plate reads, her dynamic approach and matchless optimism energize the entire room.

Books By Dr. Erica Miller

Authentic Conversations of Guts, Grit, and Gusto

Chronologically Gifted:
Aging With Gusto

Dr. Erica Miller recognizes that growing old is not an option, but she’s learned that it’s entirely possible to face the aging process with a healthy mixture of acceptance and enthusiasm. Often those adopting this attitude live happier, longer lives.
Dr. Miller calls these people, herself included, the chronologically gifted.

Don’t Tell Me I Can’t Do It:
Living Audaciously in the
Here and Now

Holocaust survivor and accomplished mental health professional, Dr. Erica Miller, shares her five core beliefs she acquired throughout her life. 
Dr. Miller has led a colorful, amazing life, and this book offers an engaging combination of her personal recollections and self-help guidance.

The Dr. Erica Miller Story:
From Trauma to Triumph

Dr. Erica Miller, having survived four years in a Nazi holding camp during WW II, tells a no-holds-barred story of bravery and human cruelty that is both riveting and inspirational. Facing obstacles that would daunt most of us, she inspires readers with her perseverance and her unprecedented life accomplishments.

Many people experience challenges in life, but I have never met a more inspiring, fearless woman than Dr. Erica Miller.

 

MARY ANN HALPIN

Founder and CEO, Fearless Women Global

We have witnessed tragedies of immense proportion on a regular basis. However, we have also seen the power of the human spirit at its greatest. Dr. Erica Miller’s story is a strong example of how truly powerful the human spirit can be when put to the test.

 

REBECCA AND DR. PETER GROSSMAN

Grossman Burn Centers and Foundation

Dr. Erica Miller is such an engaging and inspirational speaker. Only she can deliver such an authentic perspective of history, trauma and living beyond the Holocaust from both a clinical and personal perspective. She had us all laughing and crying!

 

RENEE HANSON MALONE

Director of Development, Austin Child Guidance Center

Erica Miller’s “The Dr. Erica Miller Story: From Trauma to Triumph” is a brave and riveting book about the horror of surviving the Holocaust. She turned her darkness into hope and light. A must-read for anyone curious about the power that rose from Hitler’s ashes.

 

IRIS KRASNOW

Bestselling Author, “Surrendering to Marriage” and “Surrendering to Motherhood”

Authentic Conversations

Get Inspired…

Age Is Just a Number

Age Is Just a Number

Age is just a number. We can determine at any age to reverse our functional deterioration and live our best years now—with or without our genes’ cooperation. So while we need to admit we’re getting older, it’s our attitude about age that matters. Here’s my advice:

Stop fighting it.
Embrace it.
Own it.
Love it.

You might wonder how it’s possible to love the aging process, but really it all begins with attitude. I’m not asking you to love the limitations that aging might bring. My younger readers don’t yet know this, but it’s not fun having to stop for a breather while other, younger peers run on ahead of you. It’s not fun having to make more frequent trips to the bathroom. But my older readers can take heart because there’s good news: being chronologically gifted doesn’t mean you have to pretend to be young! Isn’t that a relief? Aren’t you glad to hear that it’s okay to be old—to act your age? And for younger readers, there’s good news, too. Being chronologically gifted means it’s okay to get older. You don’t have to cling to your youth as though there’s nothing left to look forward to once the gray hairs outnumber the colored ones. In fact, on that day, you’ll actually have more to enjoy about life than you can possibly imagine from where you are right now.

Now don’t misunderstand me. I’m not saying that older people can just aggressively tell the world, “I’m old…deal with it!” The world is going to move forward with or without us as we age. If we want to continue having a meaningful opportunity to participate in life, then we’re going to need a healthy mind and a healthy body. We won’t always be young, but we’ll always be growing. So let’s focus less on the number our age represents, and more on the fact that we’re continuously evolving— all the way to our last breath. This need for meaningful development is something that 20-year-olds and 80-year-olds have in common. In their own, age-appropriate ways, both groups are on their way to becoming a better version tomorrow of who they are today.

That’s right. No matter what our age is, we only thrive inasmuch as we continue growing into better, more well-rounded people. I use that word “better” in its basic qualitative sense. Each time we acquire a piece of knowledge or improve upon a skill that helps us deepen relationships, appreciate our experiences, and leave a more robust legacy, we’ve made ourselves better people than we were before. It doesn’t matter how small the change is as long as it’s a true change. Period.

And that’s the goal we have to keep before us if we hope to live a longer, more meaningful and rewarding life. That’s they way the chronologically gifted live. We have to get up each morning, asking ourselves what we think, say and do that will help us go to bed that night feeling good about ourselves.

read more
Five Tips for Preserving Memory

Five Tips for Preserving Memory

Memory is just one of the brain’s many functions. Many people are concerned about losing their memory and developing dementia. While changes in memory occur throughout our lifetime, they become more noticeable as we age. But there are ways to manage the process and preserve memory functions. Here are five tips to help accomplish that goal:

  1. Strive to create new memory connections. This means seeking out more social interactions and opportunities to engage with people.
  2. Maintain a positive attitude. Recognize the brain has plasticity, so you can learn or re-learn skills throughout life. This requires commitment and practice.
  3. Mentally stimulate yourself. Whether through brain games, reading, or intellectual pursuits, these activities promote memory and cognitive functioning.
  4. Stay healthy. Exercise regularly and practice good nutrition to keep your brain healthy.
  5. Enjoy hobbies and other activities. Think about what you’ve lost interest in and find ways to replace or develop new pursuits.

Change the perception
So how can we extend our lives? Tune out the negative. Focus on the positive. Instead of using the word “old,” substitute “wise,” “mature,” “seasoned” and “experienced.” Think about it: in most cultures, elders are typically revered for their accumulation of knowledge and experience. Even those who haven’t accomplished much of special merit exhibit a time-tested combination of cultivated skills and experiential wisdom that rightly inspires humility in younger people (who do well to capitalize on their insights). So, almost by default, age demands more than a modicum of respect.

With the right information and mindset, people can learn how to approach one’s later years with optimism and determination, recognizing that no one ever has to lose their cultural edge. After all, people are living longer, healthier lives every day, all over the world. A huge part of why aging seems to come upon people suddenly and overwhelmingly is because people don’t take the steps early on that will give them the best possible chance of living long, healthy and meaningful lives.

Consider the aging process with a healthy mixture of acceptance and enthusiasm. This mind shift leads people to live happier (and often longer) lives. Known as the chronologically gifted, these people regard their age as a gift, the seal of a lifelong journey for which they are profoundly grateful. It’s a journey that began at birth and one they hope to continue through a personal legacy that immortalizes them in the memories of others. Facing their own mortality, the chronologically gifted are determined to live with significance, passion, and purpose in the here and now.

References:
https://news.yale.edu/2002/07/29/thinking-positively-about-aging-extends-life-more-exercise-and-not-smoking
https://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/releases/psp-832261.pdf

read more
10 Principles and Beliefs Adopted by the Chronologically Gifted

10 Principles and Beliefs Adopted by the Chronologically Gifted

What you are to be, you are now becoming. Here are 10 principles that when practiced, will lead to longer, happier, healthier, more fulfilled lives.

  1. Get rid of the phrase, “I’m too old for that.” Eliminate it from daily vocabulary and from all thinking. Instead of approaching old age as an imposition of new limitations, focus on opportunities to overcome challenges and acquire new skills.
  2. Find a reason for getting up in the morning. It’s important for everyone to figure out what makes him or her tick when others want to just give up. Write it down. Create a life mantra. Any time the difficulties of life threaten to overwhelm, let your inner sense of purpose be the reminder that life matters now.
  3. Connect with something bigger. In addition to daily pursuits and occasional travel, volunteer for a worthy cause. Plug in to a spiritual community. Meditate. Pray. Read thought-provoking books that address life’s “big questions.” Get in touch with a Higher Power.
  4. Look on the bright side. Embrace a positive style. Hardship is temporary. Victory is just around the corner. Find little reasons every day to be grateful for life—even in the face of negativity. Resolve to live mindfully and savor the best gifts that life has to offer. Focus on solutions, not problems.
  5. Get moving. No excuses. Pick a physical activity that brings true enjoyment and real passion, and do it—regularly. Take a lot of walks. Use the stairs. Bike to the store instead of driving. Plant and tend a garden in the backyard. Find ways to incorporate low-intensity exercise of all kinds (strength, balance and aerobic) into daily life to ward off the potentially debilitating effects of aging.
  6. Stay fueled. Eat more fruits and vegetables and fewer simple carbohydrates. Avoid processed foods. Drink lots of water and an occasional glass of red wine. Consume smaller portions. Don’t eat “on the go.” Put unhealthy foods out of sight and out of reach to purge temptations.
  7. Create personal Blue Zones. A home can be organized to facilitate good sleep, healthy eating habits and spiritual well-being. Get rid of excess technological “noise,” and create a space for meditation. Shed the clutter and add some greenery. Invest in comfortable pillows and light-blocking drapes for the bedroom. Display pictures of family and friends and souvenirs of treasured life experiences.
  8. Don’t do it alone. Connect with like-minded, loyal, authentic people who will help their loved ones reach their goals. Spend time with them regularly. Share their burdens and vice versa. Rejoice in victories together. Learn to forgive and reach out to estranged family members before it’s too late to be reconciled. Life is too short for grudges.
  9. Believe in yourself. Give credit where credit is due. Focus on becoming the best you can be. Remember, obstacles are only temporary setbacks that can be overcome.
  10. Seize the day. Live today as though it really matters. Don’t do anything to cause regret, and don’t let fear prevent the full experience of your life in the here and right now.
read more
Age Is Just a Number

Age Is Just a Number

Age is just a number. We can determine at any age to reverse our functional deterioration and live our best years now—with or without our genes’ cooperation. So while we need to admit we’re getting older, it’s our attitude about age that matters. Here’s my advice:

Stop fighting it.
Embrace it.
Own it.
Love it.

You might wonder how it’s possible to love the aging process, but really it all begins with attitude. I’m not asking you to love the limitations that aging might bring. My younger readers don’t yet know this, but it’s not fun having to stop for a breather while other, younger peers run on ahead of you. It’s not fun having to make more frequent trips to the bathroom. But my older readers can take heart because there’s good news: being chronologically gifted doesn’t mean you have to pretend to be young! Isn’t that a relief? Aren’t you glad to hear that it’s okay to be old—to act your age? And for younger readers, there’s good news, too. Being chronologically gifted means it’s okay to get older. You don’t have to cling to your youth as though there’s nothing left to look forward to once the gray hairs outnumber the colored ones. In fact, on that day, you’ll actually have more to enjoy about life than you can possibly imagine from where you are right now.

Now don’t misunderstand me. I’m not saying that older people can just aggressively tell the world, “I’m old…deal with it!” The world is going to move forward with or without us as we age. If we want to continue having a meaningful opportunity to participate in life, then we’re going to need a healthy mind and a healthy body. We won’t always be young, but we’ll always be growing. So let’s focus less on the number our age represents, and more on the fact that we’re continuously evolving— all the way to our last breath. This need for meaningful development is something that 20-year-olds and 80-year-olds have in common. In their own, age-appropriate ways, both groups are on their way to becoming a better version tomorrow of who they are today.

That’s right. No matter what our age is, we only thrive inasmuch as we continue growing into better, more well-rounded people. I use that word “better” in its basic qualitative sense. Each time we acquire a piece of knowledge or improve upon a skill that helps us deepen relationships, appreciate our experiences, and leave a more robust legacy, we’ve made ourselves better people than we were before. It doesn’t matter how small the change is as long as it’s a true change. Period.

And that’s the goal we have to keep before us if we hope to live a longer, more meaningful and rewarding life. That’s they way the chronologically gifted live. We have to get up each morning, asking ourselves what we think, say and do that will help us go to bed that night feeling good about ourselves.

Five Tips for Preserving Memory

Five Tips for Preserving Memory

Memory is just one of the brain’s many functions. Many people are concerned about losing their memory and developing dementia. While changes in memory occur throughout our lifetime, they become more noticeable as we age. But there are ways to manage the process and preserve memory functions. Here are five tips to help accomplish that goal:

  1. Strive to create new memory connections. This means seeking out more social interactions and opportunities to engage with people.
  2. Maintain a positive attitude. Recognize the brain has plasticity, so you can learn or re-learn skills throughout life. This requires commitment and practice.
  3. Mentally stimulate yourself. Whether through brain games, reading, or intellectual pursuits, these activities promote memory and cognitive functioning.
  4. Stay healthy. Exercise regularly and practice good nutrition to keep your brain healthy.
  5. Enjoy hobbies and other activities. Think about what you’ve lost interest in and find ways to replace or develop new pursuits.

Change the perception
So how can we extend our lives? Tune out the negative. Focus on the positive. Instead of using the word “old,” substitute “wise,” “mature,” “seasoned” and “experienced.” Think about it: in most cultures, elders are typically revered for their accumulation of knowledge and experience. Even those who haven’t accomplished much of special merit exhibit a time-tested combination of cultivated skills and experiential wisdom that rightly inspires humility in younger people (who do well to capitalize on their insights). So, almost by default, age demands more than a modicum of respect.

With the right information and mindset, people can learn how to approach one’s later years with optimism and determination, recognizing that no one ever has to lose their cultural edge. After all, people are living longer, healthier lives every day, all over the world. A huge part of why aging seems to come upon people suddenly and overwhelmingly is because people don’t take the steps early on that will give them the best possible chance of living long, healthy and meaningful lives.

Consider the aging process with a healthy mixture of acceptance and enthusiasm. This mind shift leads people to live happier (and often longer) lives. Known as the chronologically gifted, these people regard their age as a gift, the seal of a lifelong journey for which they are profoundly grateful. It’s a journey that began at birth and one they hope to continue through a personal legacy that immortalizes them in the memories of others. Facing their own mortality, the chronologically gifted are determined to live with significance, passion, and purpose in the here and now.

References:
https://news.yale.edu/2002/07/29/thinking-positively-about-aging-extends-life-more-exercise-and-not-smoking
https://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/releases/psp-832261.pdf